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Digital Discourse

Bibliography

Giorgio Buccellati – March 2021

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AUTHOR LAST, FIRST NAME
DATE TITLE
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Austin, Drew
2022 The End of Infinite Data Storage
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Benanti, Paolo
2022 La condizione tecno-umana 2016
Le macchine sapienti 2019
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Benasayag, Miguel
Il cervello aumentato 2016

Funzionare o esistere 2019

The Tyranny of Algorithms 2021

     fnctionalism -- see Searle.
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Birkerts, Sven
1994 The Gutenberg Elegies.
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Digital thought
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Buccellati, Giorgio
1981 "The Origin of Writing and the Beginning of History"
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Bush, Vannevar
1945 "As We May Think"
Available online: www.theatlantic.com/magazine/print/1945/07/as-we-may-think/303881
     As Director of the Office of Scientific Research and Development, Dr. Vannevar Bush has coordinated the activities of some six thousand leading American scientists in the application of science to warfare. In this significant article he holds up an incentive for scientists when the fighting has ceased. He urges that men of science should then turn to the massive task of making more accessible our bewildering store of knowledge. For years inventions have extended man's physical powers rather than the powers of his mind. Trip hammers that multiply the fists, microscopes that sharpen the eye, and engines of destruction and detection are new results, but not the end results, of modern science. Now, says Dr. Bush, instruments are at hand which, if properly developed, will give man access to and command over the inherited knowledge of the ages. The perfection of these pacific instruments should be the first objective of our scientists as they emerge from their war work. Like Emerson's famous address of 1837 on "The American Scholar," this paper by Dr. Bush calls for a new relationship between thinking man and the sum of our knowledge. – [Editor's abstract]
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Cabiddu, Maria Agostina
1994 Bellezza.
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Digital thought
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Carr, Nicholas
2010 The Shallows. What the Internet is doing to Our Brains.
[Available to me as ePub---.]
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Digital thought
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Cimatti, Felice
2011 La vita che verrà
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Cole, David
2011 "The Chinese Room Argument", The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2020 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.), URL https://plato.stanford.edu/archives/win2020/entries/chinese-room/.
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Dreyfus, Hubert
1994 What Computers still Can't Do. A Critique of Artificial Reason.
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Digital thought
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Foucault, Michel
1969 L'archéologie du savoir
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Digital thought
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Freire, Paulo
1969 Paedagogy of the Oppressed
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Digital thought
     [dialogic nature of education] .
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Grafton, Anthony
1999 The Footnote. A Curious History
Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Pp. xi-241
     Tracing the origin of footnotes backwards — from the recent development by Ranke in the late 19th century to the distant ancestor of exact documentation in the 4th century — Grafton delivers a “history of the footnotes that actually appear in the margins of modern historical works” (vii).
     Although not changing historical writing significantly, the practice of citing authorities is traceable to legal writers in Late Antiquity. By the late 15th century, Athanasius Kircher’s research has shown “an encyclopedic willingness to accommodate the incongruous and the alien, one that allowed many voices to speak, and many alphabets to appear, on the same page” (153). In the late 17th century, the prevalence of footnotes in historical writing was established in Pierre Bayle’s Dictionaire historique et critique, in which, by compiling a “vast accumulation of passages from other texts, of exegesis, summary, and rebuttal,” he “devised and defended a double form of narrative” that “both stated final results and explained the journey necessary to reach them”(199-200).
     This eventually built up to Ranke’s alleged “invention” of footnotes, with which Grafton started his book. The word invention is in quotes, because, as Grafton’s survey has shown, Ranke formed the new historical writing technique by “snatch-and-grab raid[ing] on the glittering shop-windows of other disciplines” (230). Seeing footnotes as a way to present the process of arguments link by link and straddling knowledge from various contexts altogether like tree roots linking nodes to nodes to all directions, Grafton revealed that the idea of cross-referencing is not a modern invention and came to a realization — he surely wanted his readers to discover it as well — that “[o]ne who actually follows historians’ footnotes back to their sources, …… taking the time to trace the deep, twisted roots of the blasted tree of scholarly polemic, may well discover much more of human interest than one would expect buried in the acid subsoil” (13).
7.Perspectives / Antecedents
3. Websites/Modalities
Zichan Wang – July 2022.
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Harley, Diane; Sophia Krzys Acord; Sarah Earl-Novell; C. Judson King
2010 Assessing the Future Landscape of Scholarly Communication:
An Exploration of Faculty Values and Needs in Seven Disciplines
     This book is the final report of the research project, The Future of Scholarly Communication, conducted by Center for Studies in Higher Education. It examines three aspects of scholarly communication — researchers’ needs, existing and emerging modes of communication, as well as future scenarios of communication.
     By interviewing scholars in seven disciplines — archaeology, astrophysics, biology, economics, history, music, and political science — the project points out the needs and expectations in five key areas that emerge across the seven fields (P.20):
     (1) The development of more nuanced tenure and promotion practices that do not rely exclusively on the imprimatur of the publication or easily gamed citation metrics,
     (2) A reexamination of the locus, mechanisms, timing, and meaning of peer review,
     (3) Competitive high-quality and affordable journals and monograph publishing platforms (with strong editorial boards, peer review, and sustainable business models),
     (4) New models of publication that can accommodate arguments of varied length, rich media, and embedded links to data; plus institutional assistance to manage permissions of copyrighted material,
     (5) Support for managing and preserving new research methods and products, including components of natural-language processing, visualization, complex distributed databases, GIS, among many others..
     In the field of archaeology, the project highlights the particular importance in constructing a frame of digital discourse. This is first because archaeological excavation is a non-repeatable process — once the materials were excavated, they are effectively “destroyed” (in the sense that the materials can never be restored to their original state). As such, archaeologists are urged and obligated to retrieve, document, present, and share as much information as possible. The purpose of such practices is not to serve the excavators’ own research, but to “to preserve and share large amounts of diverse data for posterity and reuse” (31), so that the database may be appreciated and utilized by researchers with a diversity of topics, now and in the future.
     Another reason why constructing a digital framework is particularly important in archaeology is that the field is collaborative and interdisciplinary and collaborative research environments call for “mechanisms for amending previously published interpretations” (32). While the necessity for a digital transformation is well-acknowledged, the project also reveals that the endeavor is only at its beginning, which calls for further establishment, such as clear guideline for data curation and storage, in order to maintain the quantity and quality of archaeological digital discourse.
7.Perspectives / Antecedents
3. Websites/Modalities
Zichan Wang – July 2022.
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Higgett, Jeremy
2019 "Intrinsic Digitality"
www.introspectivedigitalarchaeology.com/2019/03/19/intrinsic-digitality/
     [Minimal components are so structurally, not in absolute terms.]
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PAolini, Paolo
2021 "Informatino Modeling and Multi-linear Digital Discourse"
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Project Gutenberg

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Searle, John R.
1980 "Minds, Brains, Programs"
2004 Mind. A Brief Introduction
     Chinese Room experiment.
     Functionalism -- see Benasayag
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Stavanger Declaration
2018
     Text in EL-G .
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Taylor, James and Nicolò Dell'Unto
2021 "Skeuomorphism in Digital Archeological Practice:
A Barrier to Progress, or a Vital Cog in the Wheels of Change?"

in Open Archaeology 7, pp. 482-498
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Digital thought
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Thurlow, Crispin & Kristine Mroczek
2011 Digital Discourse. Language in the New Media
     Digital Discourse presents sociolinguistic research on the languages used in new media, ranging from text messaging, blogs, internet commentary, to television news, tourists’ photo sharing, YouTube videos, and social media. This edited volume is organized around “four most important concepts or organizing principles,” including “discourse, technology, multimodality, ideology” (xviiii).
     First, the editors understand discourse as “the everyday life of language in use (emphasis in original) and the analysis of discourse presupposes “the social function of language, the interactional accomplishment of meaning, the signi?cance of communicator intent, and the relevance of social/cultural context” (xxiii). As such, language is mediated by the platform used and effected and altered by technology, and the digital media would have significantly shaped the discourse that happens on them. [In this sense, the digital discourse under investigation in the book is fundamentally different from the digital discourse used to organize this website.
     Second, instead of “fetishiz[ing] technology at the expense of its social meanings and cultural practices,” the editors call for attention to the interplay between languages and technologies of various kind, including digital (mechanical) technology and linguistic (semiotic) technology.
     Third, the editors point out the multimodality in communication in new media. Also, borrowing Jewitt’s articulation on the medium (e.g., printed books, CD, APP, etc.) and mode (e.g., photos, videos, writing, music, etc.), they elaborate the importance of the differences between media and modes and the interaction between them.
     Last but not least, the editors highlight the relationship between ideology and communication.
4. Digital discourse
3. Websites/Modalities
Zichan Wang – July 2022.
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Valéry, Paul
2010 Oeuvres. I. Édition établie et annotée par Jean Hytier
Bibliothèque de la Pléiade
Paris: Gallimard

English translation:
Paul Valéry. The Art Of Poetry
Translated By Denise Folliot, with an introduction By T. S.Eliot
Bollingen Series XLV 7
Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1985
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Wiener, Norbert
1948
19612
Cybernetics or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine
Cambridge: M.I.T.
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Wolf, Maryanne
2010 Reader, Come Home. The Reading Brain in a Digital World.
New York: Harper, 2018.
[Available to me as ePub.]
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Websites
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